Google I/O is the organization’s yearly designer meeting, customarily held at Moscone West in San Francisco however in 2016 moved to the Shoreline Amphitheater in Mountain View, right in Google’s lawn. It’s the place a huge number of engineers, accomplices and press meet up to see the most recent declarations on Google’s stages, administrations and (as a rule) items. The 2016 meeting will occur from May 18-20 in Mountain View, CA. 

In the event that history rehashes itself, we’ll get a pack of new Android news — and most likely a look at the up and coming M variant of Android. Additionally expect some Google Pay declarations, and upgrades to existing items. 

Chrome for the most part (and naturally) has huge impact in the I/O declarations also, and expect for additional on that front in the coming weeks, as well.

Despite spinning off an Alphabet-soup of divisions, the Google mother ship remains a sprawling company, so it’s unsurprising that its annual developer’s conference covers a continent of territory. In a two-hour-long keynote, the company took the audience on a tour of its upcoming tools and technologies. Here’s a quick trip through what you missed. And don’t forget to check out our in-depth analysis: A glimpse inside Google’s VR Daydream, One Android to rule them all? and Google’s CEO sums up his AI vision.
A global on-line paper-airplane game and, to quote one our live-bloggers, “video of lots of happy people doing weird things” leading up to the event set the tone, and as usual began with a recap of how Google’s evolved and how well it’s doing.


Android
Google released the preview of its upcoming Android N update last March. Today it unveiled some new capabilities beyond the preview version, including support for VR via its Daydream platform (see below), automatically removing less frequently used apps from the home screen, and better task switching, among other capabilities. Today the company’s releasing a beta-quality release candidate.Android VR
Google’s post-Cardboard VR products are in the dream phase for consumers, but it did show its reference-design headset, controller and tools platform for its next-gen Android-based VR solution,Daydream. Developers can get it now.It requires a heavy-duty phone; Google released specs that make a phone Daydream-ready. Compatible phones should be available this fall from major manufacturers. There’s also a VR mode that includes performance optimizations and a VR interface for navigating apps. Lots of VR-optimized content and games are in the works, including Google’s own Play Movies, Street View and Google Photos.


Instant Apps
are another attempt at improving efficiency, in this case streamlined integration between the mobile Web and standalone mobile apps. The technology downloads individual modules of an app on demand rather than requiring you to download the full app. It should improve convenience for payments and so on, but this is less of a consumer win than one for businesses and developers; it increases the likelihood that you’ll stick with them on their path to monetizing you. It will work on versions of the OS as far back as Jellybean.


Android VR
Google’s post-Cardboard VR products are in the dream phase for consumers, but it did show its reference-design headset, controller and tools platform for its next-gen Android-based VR solution,Daydream. Developers can get it now.
It requires a heavy-duty phone; Google released specs that make a phone Daydream-ready. Compatible phones should be available this fall from major manufacturers. There’s also a VR mode that includes performance optimizations and a VR interface for navigating apps. Lots of VR-optimized content and games are in the works, including Google’s own Play Movies, Street View and Google Photos.


Smart Home
Applying artificial intelligence to improve the capabilities that reside in Google Now, its Siri-wannabe Google Assistant hopes to entice more interaction by improving its conversational skills and ability to predict queries and refine results, among other capabilities. Plus, in addition to appearing on mobile devices, it’s now the centerpiece of the rather generically named Google Home (formerly known as Project Chirp), a device that the company debuted as a challenger to the Amazon Echo (which even received a shout-out and a jab).

It looks like a speaker — it is one, actually, and works with Google Cast — and the design looks pretty nice. Now you can wander around the house muttering “OK, Google.” It will be available later this year. It will also be able to access, with your permission, all of your Google-stored personal information, such as your calendar.

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